Daily Archives: November 5, 2015

Fairness Expectations and Altruistic Sharing in 15-Month-Old Infants

Human cooperation is a key driving force behind the evolutionary success of our hominin lineage. At the proximate level, biologists and social scientists have identified other-regarding preferences – such as fairness based on egalitarian motives, and altruism – as likely … Continue reading

Posted in Altruism, Children, Cooperation, Fairness, Infants | Tagged , , , ,

Stressed, Tired, Rushed: A Portrait of the Modern Family

Children are much more likely than not to grow up in a household in which their parents work, and in nearly half of all two-parent families today, both parents work full time, a sharp increase from previous decades. What hasn’t … Continue reading

Posted in Children, Family, Work | Tagged , ,

Two-year-old Children differentiate Test Questions from Genuine Questions

Children are frequently confronted with so-called ‘ test questions’. While genuine questions are requests for missing information, test questions ask for information obviously already known to the questioner. In this study we explored whether two-year-old children respond differentially to one … Continue reading

Posted in Children, Infants, Questions, Relational | Tagged , , ,

21-Month-Olds Understand the Cooperative Logic of Requests

Human communication rests on a basic assumption of partner cooperativeness, including even requesting. In the current study, an adult made an ambiguous request for an object to 21-month-old infants, with one potential referent being right in front of her and … Continue reading

Posted in Children, Cooperation, Infants, Logic, Thinking | Tagged , , , ,

Learning as Relational: Intersubjectivity and Pedagogy in Higher Education

The decision to make the student population financially responsible for their own university education has major implications for the future of higher education provision. Chief among these implications will undoubtedly be a much stronger emphasis on the student experience, not … Continue reading

Posted in Pedagogy, Relational learning, Relationships, Student, Teachers | Tagged , , , , ,

The Surprisingly Logical Minds of Babies

In particular, in my lab in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT, I have spent the past decade trying to understand the mystery of how children learn so much from so little so quickly. Because, it turns … Continue reading

Posted in Babies, Children, Cognition, Cognitive neuroscience, Infants, Minds | Tagged , , , , ,

Recent Progress on the Resilience of Complex Networks

Many complex systems in the real world can be modeled as complex networks, which has captured in recent years enormous attention from researchers of diverse fields ranging from natural sciences to engineering. The extinction of species in ecosystems and the … Continue reading

Posted in Complex network, Networks of networks, Resilience | Tagged , ,

Modeling Cities and Regions as Complex Systems

Cities and regions grow (or occasionally decline), and continuously transform themselves as they do so. This book describes the theory and practice of modeling the spatial dynamics of urban growth and transformation. As cities are complex, adaptive, self-organizing systems, the … Continue reading

Posted in City, Complex systems, Region | Tagged , ,

An Ontological Understanding of Dialogue in Education

This dissertation develops an ontological understanding of dialogue that is then used to reconsider the forms and purposes of schooling.  Employing the works of Martin Buber and Mikhail Bakhtin, the work departs from the literature on schooling that treats dialogue … Continue reading

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