Monthly Archives: November 2017

Time-Based Frameworks for Valuing Knowledge: Maintaining Strategic Knowledge

To survive and flourish in a changing and unpredictable world, organizations and people must maintain strategic power over necessary resources – often in the face of competition. Knowledge contributes to that strategic power. Without vigilance to maintain its currency and … Continue reading

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Requisite Variety, Autopoiesis, and Self-organization

Ashby’s law of requisite variety states that a controller must have at least as much variety (complexity) as the controlled. Maturana and Varela proposed autopoiesis (self-production) to define living systems. Living systems also require to fulfill the law of requisite … Continue reading

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Autopoiesis in Creativity and Art

The term autopoiesis, (meaning ‘self’) and ‘poiesis’ (meaning ‘creation, production’) defines a system capable of reproducing and maintaining itself. The term was introduced by the theoretical biologists, Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela, in 1972 to define the self-maintaining chemistry of … Continue reading

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Innovation, from cells to societies

Innovation is the breaking of an adaptive pattern through the emergence of phenotypic novelty, sometimes corresponding to a new ecological function. Phenotypes in biology include anatomical, physiological and behavioral traits, such as bird wings permitting flight. Innovations are also obviously a part of … Continue reading

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The Passion for Learning and Knowing

Abstraction’ as micro-learning-process is rarely used to analyze practices of organizational learning. In this paper, we portray abstraction as a basic learning process that prevails even in contexts characterized by high degrees of uncertainty and heterogeneity, that is, in high … Continue reading

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How social cognition can inform social decision making

Social decision-making is often complex, requiring the decision-maker to make inferences of others’ mental states in addition to engaging traditional decision-making processes like valuation and reward processing. A growing body of research in neuroeconomics has examined decision-making involving social and … Continue reading

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Finding and evaluating community structure in networks

We propose and study a set of algorithms for discovering community structure in networks-natural divisions of network nodes into densely connected subgroups. Our algorithms all share two definitive features: first, they involve iterative removal of edges from the network to … Continue reading

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How social networks make us smarter

By harnessing the power of our collective intelligence, can humans as a species work together to implement thoughtful solutions in an age of connectivity? In a world riddled with big problems, leading social scientist Alex ‘Sandy’ Pentland has heartening news. … Continue reading

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Introducing Social Media Intelligence

We introduce the latest member of the intelligence family. Joining IMINT, HUMINT, SIGINT and others is ‘SOCMINT’ – social media intelligence. In an age of ubiquitous social media it is the responsibility of the security community to admit SOCMINT into … Continue reading

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The Evolution of Network Intelligence

Over the last several decades, civil society activists and non-governmental organizations have been employing new information and communication technologies, such as the Internet, to facilitate their activities. At the same time, an increasing number of computer scientists, hackers, and engineers … Continue reading

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